Category Archives: 1

Product Update for 03/21/2012

New Breakdown & Restock!

ACI Andrew Nude Muscle Bodies (Boxed Only)

Toys City JSOC T1 Special Mission Unit

Sideshow GI Joe Dusty
Sideshow GI Joe Cobra Desert Sniper

SDCC Exclusive #8: Mattel Cars Toon Tokyo Mater

Mattel Cars Toon Tokyo Mater
Convention Price: $20

All new die-cast vehicle from the hit cartoon Mater’s Tall Tales (“If I’m lyin’, I’m cryin’!”) on the Disney Channel. With “flames” shooting out the back!

SDCC Exclusive #7 – Mattel Masters of the Universe Mo-Larr vs Skeletor Figure Set

Mattel Masters of the Universe Mo-Larr vs Skeletor Figure Set
SDCC Price:
$40

Mo-Larr was featured in the now famous episode featured on the DVD release of Robot Chicken Season 2 where he chased down Skeletor and relieved him of an impacted wisdom tooth, sans numbing agent. Skeletor features a new head with missing tooth, Havok Staff, Power Sword, and Half Power Sword. Mo-Larr, Eternian Dentist, comes with five assorted dental tools, including @#%!$ drill and floss. Watch the hilarious YouTube video below.

 

Product Update for 01/07/2010

*Update for 01/07/10*

New Breakdowns & Restock!

Dragon WWII British Martin Hicks

Dragon DX09 WWII German Dieter Radler
Dragon DX09 WWII German Erich Schwarz
Dragon DX09 WWII German Hans Leiter
Dragon DX09 WWII German Klaus Koenig

Remembering Roy Disney

Roy Edward Disney, the nephew of Walt Disney, died Wednesday after a yearlong battle with stomach cancer at the age of 79.

Roy played a key role in the revitalization of the Walt Disney Co. and Disney’s animation legacy.

His father, Roy O. Disney, co-founded the Disney entertainment business with Walt Disney in 1923.

Roy E. Disney‘s 56-year association with the company culminated in 2003 when he stepped down as vice chairman of Disney’s board and chairman of the Disney Studio’s Animation Department. He kept the title director emeritus and consulted with the company in his final years.

As head of Disney Animation, Disney helped to guide the studio to a new golden age of animation with an unprecedented string of artistic and box office successes that included ‘The Little Mermaid,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘Aladdin’ and ‘The Lion King.’

I had the good fortune of meeting Roy when Jeff Kurtti and he were doing a book signing for Jeff’s new book, What the Sea Teaches Us: The Crew of the Morning Light. Roy had written the forward for the book. I was working full-time for Disney then and the signing was at the Studio Store on the studio lot in Burbank. I got there an hour early and was first in line.

Roy and his wife Leslie arrived first and I was able to have a short conversation with him. I told him how I met Joe Hale, the writer and producer of The Black Cauldron a few months before at the Disneyana Sale and Show. I told him that Joe spoke fondly of him. Roy smiled and said he hadn’t see Joe in a while, but seemed pleased to hear about Joe. The lady behind me in line was one of the Disney guides who gives tours to visiting dignitaries at Disneyland and I asked her to take a picture of Roy and me. Roy asked his wife Leslie and Jeff to be in the picture with us. As soon as she started shooting pictures for me, everyone started taking pictures somehow assuming this was a publicity shot or something. Flash bulbs were popping everywhere! It was kind of funny. I was thinking afterwards that when people were reviewing the picture they took, they were saying “So here’s Jeff, Roy, and Leslie, but I don’t know who the hell this other guy is.”

To me, meeting Roy was my special way of also meeting Walt Disney. They look very much a like. He was very friendly and easy-going. I have always credited him with reviving Disney’s foray into animation.

I hear that he will be cremated and his ashes will be scattered at sea. He also was an avid competitive sailor. He held several elapsed-time records for offshore races in the Pacific Ocean, including multiple wins in the 2,225-mile Transpac race between Hawaii and California. Seems like some nice symmetry to that.

Rest in peace Roy. We will truly miss you.

Today Starting at 10:00am! Toy Anxiety Toy Drive and Sidewalk Sale!

Grab the family and come on by! Today is our annual Toy Anxiety Toy Drive and Sidewalk Sale Event from 11:00am to 3:00pm. We will have people in costumes, raffles, and great prices at our sidewalk sale. You are automatically entered in the raffle (which occurs every 15 minutes) with every toy you donate. See you there!

 Map to the store:

Flash Forward: Many-Worlds Interpretation (Hugh Everett)

Many-worlds is an interpretation of quantum mechanics that asserts the objective reality of the wavefunction, but denies the reality of wavefunction collapse. It is also known as MWI, the relative state formulation, theory of the universal wavefunction, parallel universes, many-universes interpretation or just many worlds.

The original relative state formulation is due to Hugh Everett who formulated it in 1957. Later, this formulation was popularized and renamed many-worlds by Bryce Seligman DeWitt in the 1960s and ’70s.

Proponents argue that many-worlds reconciles how we can perceive non-deterministic events, such as the random decay of a radioactive atom, with the deterministic equations of quantum physics. Prior to many-worlds, reality had been viewed as a single “world-line”. Many-worlds, rather, views reality as a many-branched tree where every possible quantum outcome is realised.

In many-worlds, the subjective appearance of wavefunction collapse is explained by the mechanism of quantum decoherence. By decoherence, many-worlds claims to resolve all of the correlation paradoxes of quantum theory, such as the EPR paradox and Schrödinger’s cat, since every possible outcome of every event defines or exists in its own “history” or “world”. In layman’s terms, there is a very large—perhaps infinite—number of universes, and everything that could possibly have happened in our past, but didn’t, has occurred in the past of some other universe or universes.

The decoherence approach to interpreting quantum theory has been further explored and developed becoming quite popular, taken as a class overall. MWI is one of many Multiverse hypotheses in physics and philosophy. It is currently considered a mainstream interpretation along with the other decoherence interpretations and the Copenhagen interpretation.

Outline

Although several versions of many-worlds have been proposed since Hugh Everett’s original work, they all contain one key idea: the equations of physics that model the time evolution of systems without embedded observers are sufficient for modelling systems which do contain observers; in particular there is no observation-triggered wavefunction collapse which the Copenhagen interpretation proposes. Provided the theory is linear with respect to the wavefunction, the exact form of the quantum dynamics modelled, be it the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation, relativistic quantum field theory or some form of quantum gravity or string theory, does not alter the validity of MWI since MWI is a metatheory applicable to all linear quantum theories, and there is no experimental evidence for any non-linearity of the wavefunction in physics. MWI’s main conclusion is that the universe (or multiverse in this context) is composed of a quantum superposition of very many, possibly even a non-denumerablely infinitely many, increasingly divergent, non-communicating parallel universes or quantum worlds.

The idea of MWI originated in Everett’s Princeton Ph.D. thesis “The Theory of the Universal Wavefunction”, developed under his thesis advisor John Archibald Wheeler, a shorter summary of which was published in 1957 entitled “Relative State Formulation of Quantum Mechanics” (Wheeler contributed the title “relative state”; Everett originally called his approach the “Correlation Interpretation”, where “correlation” refers to quantum entanglement). The phrase “many-worlds” is due to Bryce DeWitt, who was responsible for the wider popularisation of Everett’s theory, which had been largely ignored for the first decade after publication. DeWitt’s phrase “many-worlds” has become so much more popular than Everett’s “Universal Wavefunction” or Everett-Wheeler’s “Relative State Formulation” that many forget that this is only a difference of terminology; the content of all three papers is the same.

The many-worlds interpretation shares many similarities with later, other “post-Everett” interpretations of quantum mechanics which also use decoherence to explain the process of measurement or wavefunction collapse. MWI treats the other histories or worlds as real since it regards the universal wavefunction as the “basic physical entity” or “the fundamental entity, obeying at all times a deterministic wave equation”. The other decoherent interpretations, such as many histories, consistent histories, the Existential Interpretation etc, either regard the extra quantum worlds as metaphorical in some sense, or are agnostic about their reality; it is sometimes hard to distinguish between the different varieties. MWI is distinguished by two qualities: it assumes realism, which it assigns to the wavefunction, and it has the minimal formal structure possible, rejecting any hidden variables, quantum potential, any form of a collapse postulate (i.e. Copenhagenism) or mental postulates (such as the many-minds interpretation makes).

Decoherent interpretations of many-worlds use einselection to explain how a small number of classical pointer states can emerge from the enormous Hilbert space of superpositions have been proposed by Wojciech H. Zurek. “Under scrutiny of the environment, only pointer states remain unchanged. Other states decohere into mixtures of stable pointer states that can persist, and, in this sense, exist: They are einselected.” These ideas complement MWI and bring the interpretation in line with our perception of reality.

Many-worlds is often referred to as a theory, rather than just an interpretation, by those who propose that many-worlds can make testable predictions (such as David Deutsch) or is falsifiable (such as Everett) or that all the other, non-MWI, are inconsistent, illogical or unscientific in their handling of measurements; Hugh Everett argued that his formulation was a metatheory, since it made statements about other interpretations of quantum theory; that it was the “only completely coherent approach to explaining both the contents of quantum mechanics and the appearance of the world.”

Interpreting wavefunction collapse

As with the other interpretations of quantum mechanics, the many-worlds interpretation is motivated by behavior that can be illustrated by the double-slit experiment. When particles of light (or anything else) are passed through the double slit, a calculation assuming wave-like behavior of light can be used to identify where the particles are likely to be observed. Yet when the particles are observed in this experiment, they appear as particles (i.e. at definite places) and not as non-localized waves.

Some versions of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics proposed a process of “collapse” in which an indeterminate quantum system would probabilistically collapse down onto, or select, just one determinate outcome to “explain” this phenomenon of observation. Wavefunction collapse was widely regarded as artificial and ad-hoc, so an alternative interpretation in which the behavior of measurement could be understood from more fundamental physical principles was considered desirable.

Everett’s Ph.D. work provided such an alternative interpretation. Everett noted that for a composite system – for example a subject (the “observer” or measuring apparatus) observing an object (the “observed” system, such as a particle) – the statement that either the observer or the observed has a well-defined state is meaningless; in modern parlance the observer and the observed have become entangled; we can only specify the state of one relative to the the other, i.e. the state of the observer and the observed are correlated after the observation is made. This led Everett to derive from the unitary, deterministic dynamics alone (i.e. without assuming wavefunction collapse) the notion of a relativity of states.

Everett noticed that the unitary, deterministic dynamics alone decreed that after an observation is made each element of the quantum superposition of the combined subject-object wavefunction contains two “relative states”: a “collapsed” object state and an associated observer who has observed the same collapsed outcome; what the observer sees and the state of the object have become correlated by the act of measurement or observation. The subsequent evolution of each pair of relative subject-object states proceeds with complete indifference as to the presence or absence of the other elements, as if wavefunction collapse has occurred, which has the consequence that later observations are always consistent with the earlier observations. Thus the appearance of the object’s wavefunction’s collapse has emerged from the unitary, deterministic theory itself. (This answered Einstein’s early criticism of quantum theory, that the theory should define what is observed, not for the observables to define the theory). Since the wavefunction appears to have collapsed then, Everett reasoned, there was no need to actually assume that it had collapsed. And so, invoking Occam’s razor, he removed the postulate of wavefunction collapse from the theory.

Probability

A consequence of removing wavefunction collapse from the quantum formalism is that the Born rule requires derivation, since many-worlds claims to derive its interpretation from the formalism. Attempts have been made, by many-world advocates and others, over the years to derive the Born rule, rather than just conventionally assume it, so as to reproduce all the required statistical behaviour associated with quantum mechanics. There is no consensus on whether this has been successful.

Everett, Gleason and Hartle

Everett (1957) briefly derived the Born rule by showing that the Born rule was the only possible rule, and that its derivation was as justified as the procedure for defining probability in classical mechanics. Everett stopped doing research in theoretical physics shortly after obtaining his Ph.D., but his work on probability has been extended by a number of people. Andrew Gleason (1957) and James Hartle (1965) independently reproduced Everett’s work, known as Gleason’s theorem which was later extended.

De Witt and Graham

Bryce De Witt and his doctoral student R. Neill Graham later provided alternative (and longer) derivations to Everett’s derivation of the Born rule. They demonstrated that the norm of the worlds where the usual statistical rules of quantum theory broke down vanished, in the limit where the number of measurements went to infinity.

Deutsch et al

An information-theoretic derivation of the Born rule from Everettarian assumptions, was produced by David Deutsch (1999) and refined by Wallace (2002-2009) and Saunders (2004). Deutsch’s derivation is a two-stage proof: first he shows that the number of orthonormal Everett-worlds after a branching is proportional to the conventional probability density. Then he uses game theory to shows that these are all equally likely to be observed. The last step in particular has been criticised for circularity. Other reviews have been positive, although the status of these arguments remains highly controversial. It is fair to say that some theoretical physicists have taken them as supporting the case for parallel universes. In the New Scientist article, reviewing their presentation at a September 2007 conference, Andy Albrecht, a physicist at the University of California at Davis, is quoted as saying “This work will go down as one of the most important developments in the history of science.”

Wojciech H. Zurek (2005) has produced a derivation of the Born rule, where decoherence has replaced Deutsch’s informatic assumptions. Lutz Polley (2000) has produced Born rule derivations where the informatic assumptions are replaced by symmetry arguments.

Advantages

  • MWI removes the observer-dependent role in the quantum measurement process by replacing wavefunction collapse with quantum decoherence. Since the role of the observer lies at the heart of most if not all “quantum paradoxes,” this automatically resolves a number of problems; see for example Schrödinger’s cat thought-experiment, the EPR paradox, von Neumann‘s “boundary problem” and even wave-particle duality. Quantum cosmology also becomes intelligible, since there is no need anymore for an observer outside of the universe.

  • MWI is realist, deterministic, local theory, akin to classical physics (including the theory of relativity), at the expense of losing counterfactual definiteness. MWI achieves this by removing wavefunction collapse, which is indeterministic and non-local, from the deterministic and local equations of quantum theory.

  • MWI (or other, broader multiverse considerations) provides a context for the anthropic principle which may provide an explanation for the fine-tuned universe.

  • MWI, being a decoherent formulation, is axiomatically more streamlined than the Copenhagen and other collapse interpretations; and thus favoured under certain interpretations of Ockham’s razor. Of course there are other decoherent interpretations that also possess this advantage with respect to the collapse interpretations.

Common objections and misconceptions

  • MWI states that there is no special role nor need for precise definition of measurement in MWI, yet uses the word “measurement” repeatedly through out its exposition.

MWI response: “measurements” are treated a subclass of interactions, which induce subject-object correlations in the combined wavefunction. There is nothing special about measurements (they don’t trigger any wave function collapse, for example); they are just another unitary time development process. This is why no precise definition of measurement is required in Everett’s formulation.

  • The many-worlds interpretation is very vague about the ways to determine when splitting happens, and nowadays usually the criterion is that the two branches have decohered. However, present day understanding of decoherence does not allow a completely precise, self contained way to say when the two branches have decohered/”do not interact”, and hence many-worlds interpretation remains arbitrary. This is the main objection opponents of this interpretation raise, saying that it is not clear what is precisely meant by branching, and point to the lack of self contained criteria specifying branching.

MWI response: the decoherence or “splitting” or “branching” is complete when the measurement is complete. In Dirac notation a measurement is complete when:

\lang O[i]|O[j]\rang = \delta_{ij}

where O[i] represents the observer having detected the object system in the i-th state. Before the measurement has started the observer states are identical; after the measurement is complete the observer states are orthonormal. Thus a measurement defines the branching process: the branching is as well- or ill- defined as the measurement is. Thus branching is complete when the measurement is complete. Since the role of the observer and measurement per se plays no special role in MWI (measurements are handled as all other interactions are) there is no need for a precise definition of what an observer or a measurement is – just as in Newtonian physics no precise definition of either an observer or a measurement was required or expected. In all circumstances the universal wavefunction is still available to give a complete description of reality.

Also, it is a common misconception to think that branches are completely separate. In Everett’s formulation, they may in principle quantum interfere (i.e. “merge” instead of “splitting”) with each other in the future, although this requires all “memory” of the earlier branching event to be lost, so no observer ever sees two branches of reality.

  • There is circularity in Everett’s measurement theory. Under the assumptions made by Everett, there are no ‘good observations’ as defined by him, and since his analysis of the observational process depends on the latter, it is void of any meaning. The concept of a ‘good observation’ is the projection postulate in disguise and Everett’s analysis simply derives this postulate by having assumed it, without any discussion.

MWI response: Everett’s treatment of observations / measurements covers both idealised good measurements and the more general bad or approximate cases. Thus it is legitimate to analyse probability in terms of measurement; no circularity is present.

  • Talk of probability in Everett presumes the existence of a preferred basis to identify measurement outcomes for the probabilities to range over. But the existence of a preferred basis can only be established by the process of decoherence, which is itself probabilistic or arbitrary.

MWI response: Everett analysed branching using what we now call the “measurement basis“. It is fundamental theorem of quantum theory that nothing measurable or empirical is changed by adopting a different basis. Everett was therefore free to choose whatever basis he liked. The measurement basis was simply the simplest basis in which to analyse the measurement process.

  • We cannot be sure that the universe is a quantum multiverse until we have a theory of everything and, in particular, a successful theory of quantum gravity. If the final theory of everything is non-linear with respect to wavefunctions then many-worlds would be invalid.

MWI response: all accepted quantum theories of fundamental physics are linear with respect to the wavefunction. Whilst quantum gravity or string theory may be non-linear in this respect there is no evidence to indicate this at the moment.

  • Conservation of energy is grossly violated if at every instant near-infinite amounts of new matter are generated to create the new universes.

MWI response: Conservation of energy is not violated since the energy of each branch has to be weighted by its probability, according to the standard formula for the conservation of energy in quantum theory. This results in the total energy of the multiverse being conserved.

  • Occam’s Razor rules against a plethora of unobservable universes – Occam would prefer just one universe; i.e. any non-MWI interpretation.

MWI response: Occam’s razor actually is a constraint on the complexity of physical theory, not on the number of universes. MWI is a simpler theory since it has fewer postulates. See the “advantages” section.

  • Unphysical universes: If a state is a superposition of two states ΨA and ΨB, i.e. Ψ = (aΨA + bΨB), i.e. weighted by coefficients a and b, then if b << a, what principle allows a universe with vanishingly small probability b to be instantiated on an equal footing with the much more probable one with probability a? This seems to throw away the information in the probability amplitudes. Such a theory makes little sense.

MWI response: The magnitude of the coefficients provides the weighting that makes the branches or universes “unequal”, as Everett and others have shown, leading the emergence of the conventional probabilistic rules.

  • Violation of the principle of locality, which contradicts special relativity: MWI splitting is instant and total: this may conflict with relativity, since an alien in the Andromeda galaxy can’t know I collapse an electron over here before she collapses hers there: the relativity of simultaneity says we can’t say which electron collapsed first – so which one splits off another universe first? This leads to a hopeless muddle with everyone splitting differently. Note: EPR is not a get-out here, as the alien’s and my electrons need never have been part of the same quantum, i.e. entangled.

MWI response: the splitting can be regarded as causal, local and relativistic, spreading at, or below, the speed of light (e.g. we are not split by Schrödinger’s cat until we look in the box). For spacelike separated splitting you can’t say which occured first — but this is true of all spacelike separated events, simultaneity is not defined for them. Splitting is no exception; many-worlds is a local theory.

Brief overview

Schematic representation of pair of “smallest possible” quantum mechanical systems prior to interaction: Measured system S and measurement apparatus M. Systems such as S are referred to as 1-qubit systems.

In Everett’s formulation, a measuring apparatus M and an object system S form a composite system, each of which prior to measurement exists in well-defined (but time-dependent) states. Measurement is regarded as causing M and S to interact. After S interacts with M, it is no longer possible to describe either system by an independent state. According to Everett, the only meaningful descriptions of each system are relative states: for example the relative state of S given the state of M or the relative state of M given the state of S. In DeWitt’s formulation, the state of S after a sequence of measurements is given by a quantum superposition of states, each one corresponding to an alternative measurement history of S.

 

Schematic illustration of splitting as a result of a repeated measurement.

For example, consider the smallest possible truly quantum system S, as shown in the illustration. This describes for instance, the spin-state of an electron. Considering a specific axis (say the z-axis) the north pole represents spin “up” and the south pole, spin “down”. The superposition states of the system are described by (the surface of) a sphere called the Bloch sphere. To perform a measurement on S, it is made to interact with another similar system M. After the interaction, the combined system is described by a state that ranges over a six-dimensional space (the reason for the number six is explained in the article on the Bloch sphere). This six-dimensional object can also be regarded as a quantum superposition of two “alternative histories” of the original system S, one in which “up” was observed and the other in which “down” was observed. Each subsequent binary measurement (that is interaction with a system M) causes a similar split in the history tree. Thus after three measurements, the system can be regarded as a quantum superposition of 8= 2 × 2 × 2 copies of the original system S.

The accepted terminology is somewhat misleading because it is incorrect to regard the universe as splitting at certain times; at any given instant there is one state in one universe.

Relative state

The goal of the relative-state formalism, as originally proposed by Everett in his 1957 doctoral dissertation, was to interpret the effect of external observation entirely within the mathematical framework developed by Paul Dirac, von Neumann and others, discarding altogether the ad-hoc mechanism of wave function collapse. Since Everett’s original work, there have appeared a number of similar formalisms in the literature. One such idea is discussed in the next section.

The relative-state interpretation makes two assumptions. The first is that the wavefunction is not simply a description of the object’s state, but that it actually is entirely equivalent to the object, a claim it has in common with some other interpretations. The second is that observation or measurement has no special role, unlike in the Copenhagen interpretation which considers the wavefunction collapse as a special kind of event which occurs as a result of observation.

The many-worlds interpretation is DeWitt’s popularisation of Everett’s work, who had referred to the combined observer-object system as being split by an observation, each split corresponding to the different or multiple possible outcomes of an observation. These splits generate a possible tree as shown in the graphic below. Subsequently DeWitt introduced the term “world” to describe a complete measurement history of an observer, which corresponds roughly to a single branch of that tree. Note that “splitting” in this sense, is hardly new or even quantum mechanical. The idea of a space of complete alternative histories had already been used in the theory of probability since the mid 1930s for instance to model Brownian motion.

 

Partial trace as relative state. Light blue rectangle on upper left denotes system in pure state. Trellis shaded rectangle in upper right denotes a (possibly) mixed state. Mixed state from observation is partial trace of a linear superposition of states as shown in lower left-hand corner.

Under the many-worlds interpretation, the Schrödinger equation, or relativistic analog, holds all the time everywhere. An observation or measurement of an object by an observer is modeled by applying the wave equation to the entire system comprising the observer and the object. One consequence is that every observation can be thought of as causing the combined observer-object’s wavefunction to change into a quantum superposition of two or more non-interacting branches, or split into many “worlds”. Since many observation-like events have happened, and are constantly happening, there are an enormous and growing number of simultaneously existing states.

If a system is composed of two or more subsystems, the system’s state will be a superposition of products of the subsystems’ states. Once the subsystems interact, their states are no longer independent. Each product of subsystem states in the overall superposition evolves over time independently of other products. The subsystems states have become correlated or entangled and it is no longer possible to consider them independent of one another. In Everett’s terminology each subsystem state was now correlated with its relative state, since each subsystem must now be considered relative to the other subsystems with which it has interacted.

 

Successive measurements with successive splittings

Comparative properties and experimental support

One of the salient properties of the many-worlds interpretation is that observation does not require an exceptional construct (such as wave function collapse) to explain it. Many physicists, however, dislike the implication that there are infinitely many non-observable alternate universes.

as of 2006, there are no practical experiments that distinguish between Many-Worlds and Copenhagen. There may be cosmological, observational evidence.

Copenhagen interpretation

In the Copenhagen interpretation, the mathematics of quantum mechanics allows one to predict probabilities for the occurrence of various events. In the many-worlds interpretation, all these events occur simultaneously. What meaning should be given to these probability calculations? And why do we observe, in our history, that the events with a higher computed probability seem to have occurred more often? One answer to these questions is to say that there is a probability measure on the space of all possible universes, where a possible universe is a complete path in the tree of branching universes. This is indeed what the calculations give. Then we should expect to find ourselves in a universe with a relatively high probability rather than a relatively low probability: even though all outcomes of an experiment occur, they do not occur in an equal way. As an interpretation which (like other interpretations) is consistent with the equations, it is hard to find testable predictions of MWI.

Quantum suicide

There is a rather more dramatic test than the one outlined above for people prepared to put their lives on the line: use a machine which kills them if a random quantum decay happens. If MWI is true, they will still be alive in the world where the decay didn’t happen and would feel no interruption in their stream of consciousness. By repeating this process a number of times, their continued consciousness would be arbitrarily unlikely unless MWI was true, when they would be alive in all the worlds where the random decay was on their side. From their viewpoint they would be immune to this death process. Clearly, if MWI does not hold, they would be dead in the one world. Other people would generally just see them die and would not be able to benefit from the result of this experiment. See Quantum suicide.

The universe decaying to a new vacuum state

Any event that changes the number of observers in the universe may have experimental consequences. Quantum tunnelling to new vacuum state would reduce the number of observers to zero (i.e. kill all life). Some Cosmologists argue that the universe is in a false vacuum state and that consequently the universe should have already experienced quantum tunnelling to a true vacuum state. This has not happened and is cited as evidence in favour of many-worlds.

Many-minds

The many-worlds interpretation should not be confused with the similar many-minds interpretation which defines the split on the level of the observers’ minds.

Reception

There is a wide range of claims that are considered “many-worlds” interpretations. It is often claimed by those who do not believe in MWI that Everett himself was not entirely clear as to what he believed; however MWI adherents (such as DeWitt, Tegmark, Deutsch and others) believe they fully understand Everett’s meaning as implying the literal existence of the other worlds. Additionally Everett’s reported belief in quantum immortality, requires belief in the reality of all the many-worlds represented by the components of the uncollapsed universal wavefunction.

“Many-worlds”-like interpretations are now considered fairly mainstream within the quantum physics community. For example, a poll of 72 leading physicists conducted by the American researcher David Raub in 1995 and published in the French periodical Sciences et Avenir in January 1998 recorded that nearly 60% thought many-worlds interpretation was “true”. Max Tegmark also reports the result of a poll taken at a 1997 quantum mechanics workshop. According to Tegmark, “The many worlds interpretation (MWI) scored second, comfortably ahead of the consistent histories and Bohm interpretations.” Other such polls have been taken at other conferences: see for instance Michael Nielsen‘s blog report on one such poll. Nielsen remarks that it appeared most of the conference attendees “thought the poll was a waste of time”. MWI sceptics (for instance Asher Peres) argue that polls regarding the acceptance of a particular interpretation within the scientific community, such as those mentioned above, cannot be used as evidence supporting a specific interpretation’s validity. However, others note that science is a group activity (for instance, peer review) and that polls are a systematic way of revealing the thinking of the scientific community.

A 2005 minor poll on the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics workshop at the Institute for Quantum Computing University of Waterloo produced contrary results, with the MWI as the least favored.

One of MWI’s strongest advocates is David Deutsch. According to Deutsch, the single photon interference pattern observed in the double slit experiment can be explained by interference of photons in multiple universes. Viewed in this way, the single photon interference experiment is indistinguishable from the multiple photon interference experiment. In a more practical vein, in one of the earliest papers on quantum computing, he suggested that parallelism that results from the validity of MWI could lead to “a method by which certain probabilistic tasks can be performed faster by a universal quantum computer than by any classical restriction of it”. Deutsch has also proposed that when reversible computers become conscious that MWI will be testable (at least against “naive” Copenhagenism) via the reversible observation of spin.

Asher Peres was an outspoken critic of MWI, for example in a section in his 1993 textbook with the title Everett’s interpretation and other bizarre theories. In fact, Peres questioned whether MWI is really an “interpretation” or even if interpretations of quantum mechanics are needed at all. Indeed, the many-worlds interpretation can be regarded as a purely formal transformation, which adds nothing to the instrumentalist (i.e. statistical) rules of the quantum mechanics. Perhaps more significantly, Peres seems to suggest that positing the existence of an infinite number of non-communicating parallel universes is highly suspect as it violates those interpretations of Occam’s Razor that seek to minimize the number of hypothesized entities. Proponents of MWI argue precisely the opposite, by applying Occam’s Razor to the set of assumptions rather than multiplicity of universes. In Max Tegmark‘s formulation, the alternative to many-worlds is the undesirable “many words”, an allusion to the complexity of von Neumann’s collapse postulate.

MWI is considered by some to be unfalsifiable and hence unscientific because the multiple parallel universes are non-communicating, in the sense that no information can be passed between them. Others claim MWI is directly testable. Everett regarded MWI as falsifiable since any test that falsifies conventional quantum theory would also falsify MWI.

According to Martin Gardner MWI has two different interpretations: real or unreal, and claims that Stephen Hawking and Steve Weinberg favour the unreal interpretation. Gardner also claims that the interpretation favoured by the majority of physicists is that the other worlds are not real in the same way as our world is real, whereas the “realist” view is supported by MWI experts David Deutsch and Bryce DeWitt. However Stephen Hawking is on record as a saying that the “other worlds are as real as ours” and Tipler reports Hawking saying that MWI is “trivially true” (scientific jargon for “obviously true”) if quantum theory applies to all reality. Roger Penrose agrees with Hawking that QM applied to the universe implies MW, although he considers the current lack of a successful theory of quantum gravity negates the claimed universality of conventional QM.

Speculative implications

Speculative physics deals with questions also discussed in science fiction.

Quantum suicide thought experiment

It has been claimed that there is a thought experiment that would clearly differentiate between the many-worlds interpretation and other interpretations of quantum mechanics. It involves a quantum suicide machine and an experimenter willing to risk death. However, at best, this would only decide the issue for the experimenter; bystanders would learn nothing. The flip side of quantum suicide is quantum immortality.

Weak coupling

Another speculation is that the separate worlds remain weakly coupled (e.g. by gravity) permitting “communication between parallel universes”. This requires that gravity be a classical force and not quantized.

Similarity to Modal Realism

The many-worlds interpretation has some similarity to modal realism in philosophy, which is the view that the possible worlds used to interpret modal claims actually exist. Unlike philosophy, however, in quantum mechanics counterfactual alternatives can influence the results of experiments, as in the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb-testing problem or the Quantum Zeno effect.

Time travel

The many-worlds interpretation could be one possible way to resolve the paradoxes  that one would expect to arise if time travel turns out to be permitted by physics (permitting closed timelike curves and thus violating causality). Entering the past would itself be a quantum event causing branching, and therefore the timeline accessed by the time traveller simply would be another timeline of many. In that sense, it would make the Novikov self-consistency principle unnecessary.

Many-worlds in literature and science fiction

Main article: Parallel universe (fiction)

 

A map from Robert Sobel‘s novel For Want of a Nail, illustrates how small events – in this example the branching or point of divergence from our history is in October 1777 – can profoundly alter the course of history. According to the many-worlds interpretation every microscopic event is a branch point; all possible alternative histories actually exist.

The many-worlds interpretation (and the somewhat related concept of possible worlds) have been associated to numerous themes in literature, art and science fiction.

Some of these stories or films violate fundamental principles of causality and relativity, and are extremely misleading since the information-theoretic structure of the path space of multiple universes (that is information flow between different paths) is very likely extraordinarily complex. Also see Michael Clive Price’s FAQ referenced in the external links section below where these issues (and other similar ones) are dealt with more decisively.

Another kind of popular illustration of many-worlds splittings, which does not involve information flow between paths, or information flow backwards in time considers alternate outcomes of historical events. According to the many-worlds interpretation, all of the historical speculations entertained within the alternate history genre are realized in parallel universes.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Disneyland Resort President Named

By MICHAEL LYSTER
Orange County Business Journal Staff

photo-george-for-blog-150x150A Walt Disney Co. veteran who was on hand for the opening of Disney’s California Adventure is returning to run the company’s Anaheim operations.

George Kalogridis, who has been with the company for 38 years, was named Disneyland Resort president on Monday.

He’ll oversee the company’s two Anaheim theme parks, three hotels and Downtown Disney District shopping center.

Kalogridis most recently served as chief operating officer for Disneyland Resort Paris.

He replaces Ed Grier, who lead Disneyland Resort for the past three years and stepped down last week.

From 2000 to 2002, Kalogridis served as senior vice president of resort operations for Disneyland Resort where he was involved with the opening of California Adventure, Disney’s second Anaheim theme park alongside Disneyland Park.

He also oversaw day-to-day operations of Downtown Disney and the company’s Anaheim hotels.

Kalogridis started with Disney in 1971 as a busboy at the opening of the Contemporary Resort at Walt Disney World.

He returns to Anaheim at a critical time.

The company’s Anaheim theme parks and hotels have seen a slowdown amid the recession.

The Anaheim operations generate more than $1 billion in annual revenue during good years. For the 12 months through June, city officials expected the Disney operations to generate $937 million in revenue.

Disney is looking to makeover plans for California Adventure to drive future visitors to Anaheim.

Last year, Disney announced plans for a $1.1 billion upgrade to the theme park, which has struggled to meet expectations in the shadow of ever popular Disneyland.

Since opening eight years ago, California Adventure has drawn about 5 million visitors a year, versus the 7 million Disney originally hoped for.

Disney is in the process of replacing the park’s California vacation theme with a piece of Walt Disney’s early days in Hollywood and rides based on films from the company’s Pixar Animation Studios Inc. and older Disney characters.

Flash Forward: 137 Sekuden (Seconds) Spoiler Alert!

geyer2

So, in my last blog, I talked about Kabbalah and the significance of the number 137. In last night’s episode of Flash Forward, we learn of this significance from a former Nazi war criminal, Rudolf Geyer. Geyer is in Quale Prison in Munich, Germany.  He is talking to one of the guards and says that his blackout flash forward will “get him out of this hateful place.” He has sent notice to Mark’s (Fiennes) team that he knows why the blackout occurred and wants to specifically talk to Mark about it. Mark and Janis head to Munich to talk with Geyer (who is now accompanied by his attorney). It seems that Geyer hid in the United States for 20 years, and he has been looking forward to meeting Mark for quite some time (how long I wonder?).  He saw Mark’s name in his vision. He wants to return to America and have all charges against him dropped. He will give Mark the information only in exchange for this. He worked at the Treblinka Death Camp in Poland. Treblinka was known as a camp that was primarily built for extermination. Sounds like Geyer was a pretty bad guy in his day. He offers to give Mark part of his information now as good faith and then the rest after the deal is sealed. He explains to Mark the significance of the 137 sekuden (or 137 seconds) and its association with Kabbalah, shrouded in Jewish mysticism.

Jerome MurphyIn his flash forward, Geyer is repatriated to the United States. He is at an American airport. The customs agent is Jerome Murphy. He says to Jerome that he has a “murder to thank” for his return to America.

The next day Jerome applied for the customs agent job he has in the future after having the same flash forward as Geyer.

Dead CrowsMark agrees to Geyer’s terms and then gets the second part of message. Seems that when Geyer awoke from the blackout he looked out the window and saw dead crows all over the courtyard. Geyer hands Mark a book on birds. Later, Mark learns that crows died all over the world when the blackout occurred. Doing some further checking, it seems there was a blackout in Somalia in the Ganwar Region in 1991 and dead crows were everywhere. Also, CDC doctors traveled to the Ganwar Region in response to claims that the inhabitants suffered mass loss of conciousness.

Other interesting notes:

The White Rose Nazi Resistance were killed at Quale prison. The White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent/intellectual resistance group in Nazi Germany, consisting of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. The group became known for an anonymous leaflet campaign, lasting from June 1942 until February 1943, that called for active opposition to German dictator Adolf Hitler’s regime.

Demetri (Cho) was told by the caller that an American FBI Agent was murdered by being shot 3 times in the chest.

Demetri’s cell phone call signal came from two sites at once.

Jerome Murphy’s badge number was 3276.

Did Demitri’s fiance really see his face in her flash forward or just a person standing on the beach waiting to marry her?

Did Aaron lie when he said the body exhumed was his daughter?

At the memorial service for the FBI agents, the lady that Olivia was talking to at lunch sees her future son.

10/17/09 – I just posted a couple of new Flash Foward blogs. Here are their links:

https://toyanxiety.wordpress.com/2009/10/17/flash-forward-the-curious-case-of-edward-ned-spoiler-alert/

https://toyanxiety.wordpress.com/2009/10/15/flash-forward-black-swan-theory/

Custom District 9 Alien Prawn Bust

Prawn Bust

Well, it looks like the District 9 fans want me to keep showing custom District 9 pieces that appear on eBay. There are several right now, but I thought this one was one of the more unique pieces. It is by eBay seller ashkanls and he is asking $4,199.99 or best offer. Here is the text from his listing.

You are bidding on a Custom District 9 Prawn. This is the best bust I have made so far. It stands at 10 inches tall, 13 with antennas. Antennas are removable and it weighs about 8 pounds.  I have used super sculpy to make this figure, the same compound that Sony character designers use.  Any questions please ask. 

 With that said, I want to remind you that you can win some cash by entering our 1st Annual Halloween 1:6 scale Custom Contest. Check it out right here.