Category Archives: George Lucas

Star Wars Episodes IV-VI Character Poster

Star Wars Infographic

The Star Wars Episodes IV-VI Character Poster from designer Wes Anderson is a fantastic visual tribute to the Star Wars series.  The limited run of 500 printed posters sold out in a few days on Spoke Art, but everyone can still admire the design online.

In 1978 my father took me as an excuse to go see that movie about silly robots and spaceships that everybody was talking about. I didn’t get much at that time, since I was very young, but what I do remember well is how much I enjoyed beginning my first geeky action figures collection that came right after the movie. My first figure ever was Luke Skywalker, a figure that got lost over the years. I’m still looking for it on my parent’s attic. Where are you Luke Skywalker?

With the time I became a fan, of course. As homage to that great moment of my life, here’s a new poster featuring (almost) every character of the first Star Wars trilogy in order of appearance. It is of course limited and numbered. If you want a copy, this link will take you to Spoke Art Gallery’s online shop where you can easily order one and receive it at your front door. We gave the mailmen specific orders to be dressed as Storm troopers during delivery, but they didn’t take it so well, so they probably won’t.

Star Wars Episodes IV-VI Character Poster detail

Watch Jar-Jar getting killed in this deleted Star Wars – The Phantom Menace scene

I always had a soft spot for Jar-Jar Binks. I always felt if Jar-Jar spoke in a deep voice in an unknown language with captions underneath translating what he was saying, he might have been viewed in the same vein as Han Solo or Boba Feet. Also, they would have to remove the silly things he does too. He could have been a real bad ass.

Anyway, here is a deleted scene (“The Phantom Edit”) that has surfaced where Jar-Jar bites the dust. Some of you will be very satisfied with this scene. But I just look at the potential Lucas had of making jar-Jar a real hero.

Jar-Jar Death Scene Video

Jar-Jar Death Scene

Jar-Jar Saved from Death Scene Video

Jar-Jar Saved from Death Scene

Star Wars Episode VII (7) Sneak Preview Trailer

Star Wars Episode VII (7) Sneak Preview Trailer

Sources: Lawrence Kasdan, Simon Kinberg Lock Deals to Write and Produce ‘Star Wars’ Installments

Lawrence Kasdan and Simon Kinberg

Source: The Hollywood Reporter, 4:41 PM PST 11/20/2012 by Borys Kit

The pair will write either Episode VIII or Episode IX — their exact division of responsibilities is yet to be determined — and they will also come aboard to produce the films.

Even under the secrecy of a Jedi mind trick, certain secrets — like the plans for a Death Star — can still spill out.

Lawrence Kasdan and Simon Kinberg have closed deals to write installments of the new Star Wars trilogy, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter. The pair will write either Episode VIII or Episode IX — their exact division of responsibilities is yet to be determined — and also will come aboard to produce the films.

As THR previously reported, Oscar winner Michael Arndt (Toy Story 3, Little Miss Sunshine) is writing the script for Episode VII, the first of the new trilogy and the first Star Wars film to be made without the hands-on input of creator George Lucas.

Kasdan and Kinberg would join Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy as producers.

Word of Kasdan and Kinsberg’s involvement began spilling out Tuesday, but Disney and Lucasfilm are declining to comment. Official announcements regarding the new Star Wars will appear on StarWars.com, according to the studio.

Kasdan is a Lucasfilm and Star Wars vet. He co-wrote 1980’s The Empire Strikes Back, still considered the movie series’ zenith, as well as 1983’s Return of the Jedi. He also wrote the screenplay for Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Kinberg is co-writing the new X-Men movie, X-Men: Days of Future Past and was a producer on X-Men: First Class. He also is producing Cinderella for Disney.

George and Bob Put it in Writing (Video)

Happy Halloween 2012 from your friends at Toy Anxiety

‘Star Wars’ Returns — ‘Episode 7′ Slated For 2015 And More Movies Planned As Disney Buys Lucasfilm

Disney has just confirmed that it has agreed to acquire George LucasLucasfilm Ltd, and that includes rights to the Star Wars franchise that will now continue on. The companies have targeted a 2015 release for Star Wars: Episode 7, with Episode 8 and Episode 9 to follow as the the long-term plan is to release a new feature every two or three years. “The last Star Wars movie release was 2005’s Revenge Of The Sith– and we believe there’s substantial pent-up demand”, Disney said. The deal also includes rights to the Indiana Jones franchise.

The stock and cash transaction is worth an estimated $4.05 billion, and the companies have scheduled a conference call today to discuss the deal, which was approved by the Disney board and Lucas, the sole Lucasfilm shareholder. (UPDATE: Disney’s Iger: Three New ‘Star Wars’ Movies Mapped Out; TV Plans Too)

As for the new Star Wars installments, the companies said Lucasfilm’s Kathleen Kennedy would be executive producer on Episode 7 and any additional Star Wars movies, and Lucas would serve as creative consultant. There was no indication about where the story would pick up, though technically in the franchise’s chronology it would follow Star Wars: Episode 6 — Return Of The Jedi, the third film in the initial trilogy that came out in 1983.

As part of the deal, Kennedy will become president of Lucasfilm, reporting to Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn. Kennedy, who was made Lucasfilm co-chairman June 1 as heir apparent to Lucas, will also serve as the brand manager for Star Wars, whose feature films have earned a total of $4.4 billion in global box to date. That doesn’t take into account the franchise’s massive merchandising clout that Disney CFO Jay Rasulo said will generate in 2012 close to the $215 million in consumer product revenue Marvel had when Disney bought that comics business in 2009.

Disney has built its business under chairman and CEO Bob Iger around such major acquisitions as Marvel, Pixar, ABC and ESPN.

“Lucasfilm reflects the extraordinary passion, vision, and storytelling of its founder, George Lucas,” Iger said in a release announcing the deal. “This transaction combines a world-class portfolio of content including Star Wars, one of the greatest family entertainment franchises of all time, with Disney’s unique and unparalleled creativity across multiple platforms, businesses, and markets to generate sustained growth and drive significant long-term value.”

Disney is paying approximately half of the consideration in cash and issuing approximately 40 million shares at closing based on Disney’s stock price on October 26. Lucasfilm is 100% owned by Lucasfilm chairman and founder Lucas.

“For the past 35 years, one of my greatest pleasures has been to see Star Wars passed from one generation to the next,” said Lucas. “It’s now time for me to pass Star Wars on to a new generation of filmmakers. I’ve always believed that Star Wars could live beyond me, and I thought it was important to set up the transition during my lifetime. I’m confident that with Lucasfilm under the leadership of Kathleen Kennedy, and having a new home within the Disney organization, Star Wars will certainly live on and flourish for many generations to come. Disney’s reach and experience give Lucasfilm the opportunity to blaze new trails in film, television, interactive media, theme parks, live entertainment, and consumer products.”

Lucasfilm’s businesses include live-action film production, consumer products, animation, visual effects, and audio postproduction. Disney also acquires the technologies from the San Francisco-based company, which operates under the names Lucasfilm Ltd., LucasArts, Industrial Light + Magic, and Skywalker Sound.

Do we have Star Wars Figures in Stock? You bet!

Here is just a glimpse of what we have in stock in regards to Star Wars figures, vehicles, etc. If you see something you like, give us a call at (602) 308-0292 or e-mail us at customerservice@toyanxiety.com. Tell them you saw it on the blog.

4 Things ‘Star Wars’ Fans Need to Accept About George Lucas – Part 2

By: Chris Bucholz, Cracked.com, February 14, 2012

I don’t see what the problem was with the old one, and I don’t see what the problem is with the new one. There’s just nothing here to get worked up about, and there never will be, so long as there’s no goddamned backflip sword fighting.

Finally let’s go back to “Han shot first” — the most egregious violation of everything, ever. I won’t defend this completely — it’s a clear-cut example of Lucas making his film worse — but it’s nowhere near the big deal some people would make it.

For the uninitiated, here’s the Coles Notes version of the controversy: While in the Mos Eisley Cantina, Han Solo is getting the gears from Greedo, a bounty hunter looking to collect space dollars. In the original film, as the conversation turns sour, Han gets the drop on Greedo, blowing him away under the table. In the revised version of this scene, Greedo shoots and misses, then Han shoots a fraction of a second later, finding his mark. Many people loathe this change, preferring the original version, where Han shoots first because they think this makes him more of a badass.

I’ve since found out that Lucas has made about five more versions of this scene with small variations, but in all the versions, the same three things are unchanged:

1) Han was reaching for his blaster because he was about to use it.

2) After shooting Greedo, Han walks away coolly, like he’s done this kind of thing before, and is kind of bored of it.

3) George Lucas is an idiot.

Whether George Lucas is an idiot and Han is a badass or George Lucas is an idiot and Han is a very lucky badass honestly makes no difference in how we think of Han or watch the rest of the film or live our lives. I will freely acknowledge that it’s a stupid change to make because of how it muddies the waters, but it’s way less of a big deal than everyone makes it. And even though it is undoubtedly a mistake, that actually turns out to be a good thing, because …

#2. It Gives Us Something to Complain About

Let’s take a holistic look at the whole Star Wars experience:

Complaining about Star Wars isn’t a bug, it’s a feature. The Internet probably would have collapsed due to lack of interest around the year 2000 if people didn’t have The Phantom Menace to bitch about. And in 2012, with the economy still struggling to regain its feet, we should be applauding Lucas and his addled authorial vision for his stimulating effects on the world’s bitching industry.

But if I had one final word of advice for the complainers and bitchers rushing to the ramparts to battle these latest revisions, it would have to be “moderation,” because lest we forget …

#1. It’s Just The Phantom Menace

Come on, fellas. It’s The Phantom Menace we’re talking about here. This one just isn’t worth getting that worked up about.

Save your real fury for when he puts an R2-D2 flying scene in the next Episode IV revision.

4 Things ‘Star Wars’ Fans Need to Accept About George Lucas – Part 1

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By: Chris Bucholz, Cracked.com, February 14, 2012

Last weekend the re-release of the prequel of one of the Star Wars movies came out, because apparently no one’s gotten tired of that shit yet. Rejiggered to now be in 3D — because no one’s gotten tired of that shit yet either — a number of other changes are evident in the film when compared to its original theatrical release. There’s a new Yoda now, some tweaked special effects, and, probably, an extra 28 hours of scenes set in the Galactic Senate.

This is fairly typical for the Star Wars franchise, which has a long history of “Special Editions” and “Re-releases” and something called “laser discs,” all of which feature movies that are slightly different from each other. People who always have a little bit of fudge on their faces have tracked these changes exhaustively, and as is their way, at times have even gotten quite upset about them. News that Lucas was planning changes again with this latest re-release even prompted threats of a boycott from these folks, news which delighted scientists who had created a device capable of measuring extremely small threats, and were looking for something to calibrate it with.

"0.08 microPescis. Incredible!"

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I’m not actually going to get too condescending here, because I am more or less a Star Wars fan myself. I’ve seen the films, I’ve played the games, I even went through a regrettable Star Wars novel phase in high school. (The phase was what was specifically regrettable, although the novels are no things of glory either.) I know all about Han shooting first, and I know the logical explanation for the Millennium Falcon making the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs (it makes so much sense when you think about it). I am, for lack of a better word, a tremendadork.

What I’m not though, is upset about the changes Lucas keeps making. Here’s why:

#4. Because They’re His Damned Movies

An obvious point, but it needs to be stated clearly: Star Wars fans don’t own the Star Wars movies. We just like them. If they get changed and we don’t like them any more, that’s perfectly cool, because we don’t have to like them any more. That’s the deal. All sorts of creative works come in multiple editions, director’s cuts, abridged versions, expanded versions. Lucas appears to be far more into this tinkering than other filmmakers, but he’s hardly unique. Take Blade Runner:

Currently available in 12 different cuts, the most recent of which implies that Deckard was a ghost the whole film.

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Really, if Lucas wants to fix something he thinks was mistaken in an earlier film, that’s his business. Our lives aren’t affected in any serious way if he changes it, nor does he have a contract with us to preserve The Phantom Menace as some kind of cultural monument to poor plotting. We’re just not talking about something that’s that important; it’s not the Constitution, or the Bible, or The Godfather.

I should be clear that none of this is to say that Lucas is right or wise to make these changes. Irrational or not, he knows these changes will piss off a portion of his fan base, and although pissing off his fan base hasn’t done much damage to him yet, it’s not something many other creators get away with so readily. And under no circumstances should this be taken as a blanket defense of the artistic merit of the changes, which Lucas has a very spotty track record on.

But it turns out that not all of the changes Lucas has made have been bad ones, nor is it a guarantee that any future changes he makes will be bad ones. In fact, there’s always a chance that …

#3. He Might Actually Make The Movies Better

Amongst all the hair-pulling about Greedo shooting first, or that new Jabba scene with an ambulatory beanbag chair clumsily CGI’d over a fat guy…

… it’s been forgotten that a lot of the changes actually kind of improved the films. Here’s a small one:
And here’s another …

That Episode IV: A New Hope prefix wasn’t there in the original theatrical release. It was added a couple years after, when it became evident that Star Wars was going to be a thing. Isn’t that a nice little tweak? Makes the movie seem like part of a greater whole? “What an epic story this must be!” the audience says. “But where the hell were the first three parts? Did I … did I black out for several years again?” These troubling questions set the hook perfectly, priming them for an unforgettable cinema experience, and forcing them to confront their demons.

Let’s look at the biggest change being made in The Phantom Menace 3D, aside from the addition of the dreaded Z-axis. The original release featured a puppet Yoda which has since been replaced with the CGI version we see in the other two prequels. Now I’ve seen The Phantom Menace a few times, and can’t recall a thing about Yoda — which I’m inclined to say is a good thing. In retrospect, this was probably my favorite interpretation of Yoda, in that he didn’t do any goddamned backflip sword fighting in this film. But if you look at new Yoda side by side with old Yoda, both look fine.

More Tomorrow

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